Category: Learning Theory

4. Spatial Contiguity Principle

Last week we learned that Pictures and Narration is better than Pictures and Narration and Text.  But what if you have to have Pictures and written text (no narration).  This week we look into this using the Spatial Contiguity Principle. The Spatial Contiguity Principle means that you want related words and pictures close together.  Let’s …

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3 Redundancy Principle

The Redundancy Principle is one in which you want to avoid overloading the learner’s working memory.  Remember that your student can only process so much information.  Any additional information beyond the learner’s capacity will be lost. In the redundancy principle we are looking at situations where additional information is not needed for the student to …

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2. Signaling Principle

Last week we looked at the Coherence Principle of Multimedia Learning.  In that principle we explored the effects of extraneous information.  This week we dive into the Signaling Principle, in which we try to focus attention on items that need to be learned.  Using the Signaling Principle means using cues to help guide your student’s …

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1 Coherence Principle

Last week I let you know that we would be looking at the 12 Multimedia Principles, and we’ll get started this week with the Coherence Principle.  The Coherence Principle means eliminating extraneous words, pictures, and sounds.  When this is done there is a deeper understanding of material presented.   To start looking at this principle it …

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Multimedia Learning

When we look at learning, in both the face-to-face classroom, and especially in on-line learning, an important aspect is Multimedia Learning (how we learn using words and pictures). The definition of multimedia used here is that: “Words” include spoken text or printed text.  “Pictures” would be illustrations, photos, animation, or video.  Multimedia learning then is …

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Cell Phones in the Classroom?

Have you seen cell phones in the classroom? This can be distracting to student learning, but you might not know the extent of the distraction!! Although smartphones are great way to access information, and a way to connect to each other, it is found that they limit our cognitive ability.  It’s not just the use, …

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Assessment Toolkit Updates

I recently had a workshop on the Assessment Toolkit that was built last summer (http://uashome.alaska.edu/~sitka_media/training/assessment/story_html5.html) and I was given some great information by participants of the class. I wanted to share two items that they brought up that are now going to be added into the toolkit. Yes, as a FLC reader, you get a …

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A new way to Assess?

Sometimes the best solution to a problem is the most simple solution.  Is this true of how we approach assessing our students? In the following Ted Talk, Mark Barnes gives us his theory on education and assessment and has come up with “SE2R,” which has the following steps: Summarize Explain Redirect Resubmit     Mark’s theory …

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Why Students Forget—and What You Can Do About It

“Our brains are wired to forget, but there are research-backed strategies you can use to make your teaching stick.” Here is a link to an Edutopia article to help you with student success.  It touches on cognitive learning and how the brain works, and then moves to strategies to help you create content that is memorable …

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How Do We Learn

In looking for meaningful learning we have to remember that it is the brain that gives us the mental models needed for understanding.  When we recognize the brains role, we will be in a better place to help students grasp and master the lessons we give them.  Cognitive learning is a huge subject, so expect …

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