Top Tools for Learning 2020

For the 14th year in a row, Jane Hart has ranked the top tools in technology, using data she has collected from people around the world. The list was compiled based on 2,369 votes from 45 countries. Of particular interest is the Top 100 Tools for Education. Click on the picture to see the Top 100 lists (Personal, Workplace, and Education tools are all on the same page this year). These lists show the current ranking and the change from last year.

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Here is a link to the main site – https://www.toptools4learning.com/


Look for the menu at the top of the page.

  • About gives you background to the annual survey,
  • Categories breaks down tools into categories (so if you are looking for tools in games and testing, you can easily find them), and
  • Analysis 2020 gives observations about this years results.

I hope you enjoyed looking at these charts.  Where did your favorite tools place?
Have a great weekend and thanks for reading the FLC!

Racial Equity and Justice in Southeast Alaska Speaker Series 2020 – Part 6 of 6

The last video in the Racial Equity and Justice Speaker Series is titled, Bringing It Home: Reflections, and the speaker is Dionne Brady-Howard of Sitka.

Watch Time – 40:39

This Racial Equity and Justice in Southeast Alaska Speaker Series was sponsored by the UAS Sitka Campus Title III Grant, and was in partnership with the Sitka Tribe of Alaska Social Services Department, SEARHC, the Sitka STEPS Grant, the Sitka Health Summit and Pathways Coalitions.

I hope you have enjoyed this series of webinars.  Thank you for reading the Faculty Learning Corner and have a great weekend!

Racial Equity and Justice in Southeast Alaska Speaker Series 2020 – Part 5 of 6

Megan Red Shirt-Shaw is the presenter in today’s video, We Are Still Here: On Native Identity and Activism.

Watch Time – 1:01:35

This Racial Equity and Justice in Southeast Alaska Speaker Series was sponsored by the UAS Sitka Campus Title III Grant, and was in partnership with the Sitka Tribe of Alaska Social Services Department, SEARHC, the Sitka STEPS Grant, the Sitka Health Summit and Pathways Coalitions.

Thank you for reading the Faculty Learning Corner!

Racial Equity and Justice in Southeast Alaska Speaker Series 2020 – Part 4 of 6

Today’s video in the Racial Equity series is Unconscious Intolerance To Unconscious Tolerance.  Hugh Vasquez is the presenter in this video.

Watch Time – 1:36:53

This Racial Equity and Justice in Southeast Alaska Speaker Series was sponsored by the UAS Sitka Campus Title III Grant, and was in partnership with the Sitka Tribe of Alaska Social Services Department, SEARHC, the Sitka STEPS Grant, the Sitka Health Summit and Pathways Coalitions.

Thank you for reading the Faculty Learning Corner!

Racial Equity and Justice in Southeast Alaska Speaker Series 2020 – Part 3 of 6

The series on Racial Equity continues with today’s video, Intercultural Leadership Development.  The speaker for this video is Dr. Amer F. Ahmed.

Watch Time – 1:00:00

This Racial Equity and Justice in Southeast Alaska Speaker Series was sponsored by the UAS Sitka Campus Title III Grant, and was in partnership with the Sitka Tribe of Alaska Social Services Department, SEARHC, the Sitka STEPS Grant, the Sitka Health Summit and Pathways Coalitions.

Thank you for reading the Faculty Learning Corner!

Racial Equity and Justice in Southeast Alaska Speaker Series 2020 – Part 2 of 6

Today I wanted to continue the series on Racial Equity.  Today’s video is Beyond Diversity in Higher Education with Tim Wise. He did this presentation for UAS Staff and Faculty.

Watch Time – 1:04:09

This Racial Equity and Justice in Southeast Alaska Speaker Series was sponsored by the UAS Sitka Campus Title III Grant, and was in partnership with the Sitka Tribe of Alaska Social Services Department, SEARHC, the Sitka STEPS Grant, the Sitka Health Summit and Pathways Coalitions.

Thank you for reading the Faculty Learning Corner!

Racial Equity and Justice in Southeast Alaska Speaker Series 2020 – Part 1 of 6

In September we had a Speaker Series on Racial Equity and Justice in Southeast Alaska.  It was sponsored by the UAS Sitka Campus Title III Grant, and was in partnership with the Sitka Tribe of Alaska Social Services Department, SEARHC, the Sitka STEPS Grant, the Sitka Health Summit and Pathways Coalitions.

Today, and each day next week, I am going to share the videos from these events. I believe this was an excellent series, and is important to share in case you didn’t see them live, or if you want to watch them again.

The first video is Beyond Diversity: Steps for Uprooting Racism, Privilege and Institutional Inequity with Speaker Tim Wise.

Watch time – 1:57:47

On Monday, the topic will be Beyond Diversity in Higher Education. Thanks for reading the Faculty Learning Corner!

UAS DASHBOARD Data Training with Kristen Handley

Here is an important training that was presented by Kristen Handley, who is the Institutional Effectiveness Director at UAS.  This hour long training takes you through a number of dashboards that will help get you the data you need on the Institutional Effectiveness – Student Data website.

Here is a breakdown of what you will see, as well as the timing, in case you want to jump to a specific segment.

  • Live Student Data
    • Weekly Enrollment Report – 3:35
    • Weekly Enrollment Report – Admissions – 4:35
    • Weekly Enrollment Report – Enrollment – 6:25
    • Weekly Enrollment Report – Admission Details – 7:05
    • Weekly Enrollment Report – Enrollment Details – 8:06
    • Weekly Enrollment Report – Overview Page – 8:49
    • Weekly Enrollment Report – Questions – 9:09
  • Courses – UAS Selection Enrollment
    • Enrollment by Course – 13:24
    • Enrollment by Subject – 15:03
  • Majors – Enrollment by Major
    • By Fiscal Year – 16:08
    • By Term – 18:05
    • Continued discussion – by Fiscal Year – 20:02
  • Courses – UAS Course Enrollment – End of Term
    • Enrollment by Subject – 26:20
    • Enrollment by Course – 28:01
  • Degrees and Awards
    • Degrees by Fiscal Year – 28:42
  • Course Pass Rates
    • By Course – 30:50
    • Overview Page – 31:44
  • Student Faculty Ratios
    • Fiscal Year Data – 32:36
    • Overview Page – 33:42
    • Continued – Fiscal Year Data – 34:20
  • Not on the Dashboard, but available:
    • Retention and Graduation Rates – 42:09
  • Exporting Information
    • Exporting Information – 51:05
  • Wrapping Up
    • Wrapping Up – 53.13

The Instructional Effectiveness website can be found at uas.alaska.edu/ie/

Thank you for reading the Faculty Learning Corner!

14 Seminars For Job Seekers

The UAS Sitka campus Title III Complete to Compete grant program has a series of Zoom seminars for job seekers. They are for new college graduates, current college students, or anyone considering a job change or looking for work.

The presenter of the first eight is Deborah Rydman, Career Services Coordinator/VA School Certifying Official for the University of Alaska Southeast, Juneau campus.  The additional six were produced by the Title III staff with speakers.  

Each presentation is approximately one hour in length.  Just click on the title to access the seminar.


Social Media and Your Job Search – It’s a known fact that social media plays a part when it comes to vetting a new potential employee.

References 101 – References can be confusing at times…how many, what is considered an acceptable reference for an employer? How do you ask for and get references.

Mastering the Art of Starting a New Job – What should you do to position yourself well during the first six months of what is usually the probationary period?

Job Search Strategies – Join us as we review strategies and resources, including websites for remote/virtual jobs that will optimize your job search and make it more productive.

 Internships & Volunteering – Gateway to the Workplace- Internships and volunteering experience on a student’s resume are highly valued by potential employers.

Resumes & Cover Letters – How do you choose what type of resume to write? We’ll make it simple for you and will also show you how to increase your odds of making it through that very first screening.

Virtual Interviews – How to Prepare: Face to face, in-person interviews are not the norm right now in light of COVID-19, but employers are still hiring and interviewing candidates.

Creating your Networking – For those interested in learning networking skills and launching your professional network.

Job Success – Learn about communication, teamwork, and time management… or get a refresher in time for the new year!

Work Life Balance – This workshop was live streamed and recorded at UAS Sitka Campus and features speakers as well as audience interactions. It covers stress management, mindfulness, and healthy ways to break up the work day.

Diversity and inclusion in the Work Place – This session talks about how to make a more inclusive environment for colleagues, students, customers, and volunteers.

Female Leadership Panel This session is a recording of a live panel event featuring University of Alaska Fairbanks faculty Sarah Stanley, PhD. Panelists include Alana Peterson (Executive Director, Spruce Root), Beck Meiers (General Manager, KCAW Sitka), Dani Snyder (Fire Captain, Sitka Fire Department), Tracy Sylvester (Commercial Fisherman & Vessel Owner; Fishery Conservation Network Coordinator, Alaska Longline Fishermen’s Association), and Trish White (Vice President, White’s Inc.).

College to Career Panel Discussion – A panel of Sitkan community leaders speak about their experiences moving from education into their careers.

Introduction to Marketing yourself on Social Media – Define your audience, schedule posts strategically, and master branding basics with entrepreneur Caitlin Way, multi business owner.

For more information contact Audrey Beam ajbeam@alaska.edu or call (907) 747-7785.

Here is the link to the playlist that includes all 14 seminars. You can choose from the list of videos in the collection by clicking on the thumbnail image on the right side of the screen:     https://tinyurl.com/c2cCareer 

Thank you for reading the FLC. See you next week!

Racial Equity in Education

Hands of different colors

UAS Sitka Campus is in the midst of their series of talks on Racial Equity, and I hope you have taken part.  I thought it would be appropriate to continue this very important discussion here in the Faculty Learning Corner.  

The following was published by USC’s Rossier School of Education, and is written by Estela Mara Bensimon, who is a Professor in Educational Equity, and Director of USC Rossier’s Center of Urban Education (CUE). 

What Is Racial Equity?

Racial equity is corrective justice for communities that have suffered oppression through enslavement (African Americans), genocide (Native Americans), colonization (Puerto Rico and Hawaii), and theft of territory (Mexican Americans).

According to Bensimon, equity seeks reparation for those who are denied the same opportunities as whites due to a long history of legislated (e.g., Jim Crow) and institutionalized racism (e.g, definitions of merit that advantage whites).

In education, teachers and administrators may not realize there is an equity problem because of the biases that exist in their education, training and upbringing. This can affect student outcomes, teacher performance, curriculum, admission practices and more.

Equity focuses on “dismantling whiteness.” Whiteness is a culture of values that favor white people at the expense of others. In education, it prevents historically marginalized students from reaching their potential, and professionals from advancing in their career.

(Rather than “historically marginalized”, Bensimon also uses the word “minoritized” to emphasize that people of color do not become minorities of their own accord.)

Check out these seven key takeaways about equity in education.

1. Equity Is Intertwined With Race

While equity is a trending topic in education, the word is often misused, according to Bensimon.

In a post on CUE’s website, she writes, “I now see [equity] in initiatives, articles, and proposals. I hear it in presentations, reports, and speeches. A term that was once viewed as divisive, particularly when associated with racial justice, has become commonplace.”

However, in its current usage, equity is disconnected from its racial justice roots. Schools recognize that they need to include it in policies, but there’s insufficient action behind it. As a result, a culture of whiteness continues to persist. To really invest in equity, schools need to become equity-minded, audit their own practices, and if needed, revise them to be more race conscious.

2. Inequity Is Institutional

The reason that inequity may be a bigger challenge than many schools realize is that academia has blind-spots. “We’ve been socialized to think academia is a place that is race neutral,” says Bensimon.

Research may partially be to blame. When evaluating student success, researchers tend to regard race as a variable, not an experience or political condition. Or they may ignore it altogether.

Shifting the focus of research could be helpful. Currently, researchers study students to understand how their motivation correlates to academic success. But little research is done on faculty. By surveying teachers’ beliefs and practices, we can better understand how their views on race impact educational outcomes.

3. Teachers Help—and Hurt—Equity

Bensimon notes that evidence shows white students are more likely to speak out in class than students of color. Most teachers aren’t taught to be racially literate. They don’t know how their practices might reinforce inequalities.

However, teachers can promote equity by being more race-conscious. For example, by addressing how a syllabus reflects the experiences of black or Latinx students, they can reach those who may be alienated by traditional curriculum.

Another useful way for teachers to become more equity-minded is to adopt a “first-generation” perspective. First-generation college students of color may have been deprived of the same level of preparation for college as other students.

Similarly, white teachers may not be aware of the challenges of historically minoritized students because they lack the appropriate preparation to teach them. They may also attribute lack of success to deficiencies that they associate with students of color.

4. Graduate Programs Can Train Equity-Minded Leaders

“It’s important to develop leaders of equity-minded competency,” says Bensimon. To that end, graduate programs in education can be a useful tool. Ideally, students graduate from their master’s or doctoral programs ready to drive equity at senior levels of their organization. However, be diligent when doing your research as not all programs are equipped to accomplish this task.

To properly train future practitioners and leaders, the school’s mission should expressly state a commitment to equity, and curriculum needs to be self-conscious about race. “Courses need to address whiteness as an institutional characteristic,” she adds. The takeaway? Find out if your master’s or doctoral program aligns with your interest in advancing equity.

5. Equity Is not the Same as Diversity

In education, equity and diversity are sometimes used interchangeably, but they have some significant differences. While well-intentioned, the initiative to promote diversity in schools has the ironic effect of “whitewashing” equity.

Diversity seeks to increase representation of historically marginalized students, faculty and administrators. However, often it doesn’t focus on correcting the central issue: racial injustice. Equity aims to fix the systemic conditions that cause the exclusion of students of color in education.

6. Persuade Leadership With Data

If you’re an administrator, how do you convince top leadership that racial inequity in education is a major issue? Bensimon suggests using data. Research shows that historically marginalized students perform better when they have same-race teachers.

Similarly, economics can be persuasive. For example, Latinos now outnumber whites as the largest ethnic group in California. The wealth of the state depends in part on their educational attainment. Therefore it’s in academia’s best interest to create more equitable learning environments.

7. Academia Has Room for Improvement

While academia has made strides in its effort to promote equity in education, it still has a long way to go. Bensimon highlights deeply-rooted problems such as coded language. Words like “merit” and “fit” are sometimes used in the hiring process in ways that discriminate against candidates of color or female candidates.

Systemic problems may take a long time to fix, but there are more actionable methods of advancing equity that can be implemented in the short term by leadership:

  • Acknowledge that equity is rooted in racial justice
  • Incentivize admitting and graduating students of color
  • Value work by faculty done on behalf of racial equity
  • Hire more faculty of color and faculty who are equity-minded
  • Prioritize hiring first-generation faculty who are also people of color

Equality vs Equity

Thank you for reading the FLC, and please sign up for the last two sessions of the UAS Racial Justice and Equity series.

  • Monday evening, September 21, from 7pm – 8pm.
    Founder of the online literary publication, Natives in America, Megan Red-Shirt Shaw, will present a session called We Are Still Here: On Native Identity and Activism.
  • Thursday, September 24th, from 7pm to 8pm. 
    Sitka educator and cultural leader, Dionne Brady- Howard, will present Bringing it Home: Reflection on Racial Equity in Southeast.

You can sign up for one event or all of the free events by visiting:    
tinyurl.com/justicetalks   
or just click on:  
http://c2c.learningspaces.alaska.edu/events/?fbclid=IwAR3Iez7cJtyWrc4vdU7giE5lFoXORea-RbFElHaGncM9-d2FQTF-HAxfqGc