Category: Online Courses

12. Image Principle

The Image Principle says that people do not necessarily learn better from a multimedia lesson when the speaker’s image is added to the screen. This is definitely an area that needs more research.   So what are the pros and cons of adding the speaker’s image? On one hand, we know how important teacher presence is.  …

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11. Voice Principle

Last week we looked at the Personalization Principle, and found that a speaker with a conversational style will have more impact on learning than a formal style presentation.  Today we are going to dive into this a bit more with the voice principle.  The Voice Principle means that we learn more deeply when being spoken …

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10. Personalization Principle

The Personalization Principle means that conversational style is better than formal style.  Below is a video to introduce you to the principle – The first part of the video will make you want to turn it off, but keep watching – it starts with what not to do!! When we are teaching, whether we think …

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9. Multimedia Principle

The Multimedia Principle means that “words and pictures” are better than words alone.  There has been a lot of research in this area, and it has been found that learners do, in fact, gain more knowledge with words and pictures than if they were just presented with words alone. With computing power that has gotten …

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8. Modality Principle

Last week we talked about the Pre-Training principle, and this week we look into another principle that will help us with essential processing.  The Modality Principle means that “graphics and narration” are better than “graphics and text.” Here is a video that explains the Modality principle. If you only get one thing out of today’s …

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7. Pre-Training Principle

The Pre-Training Principle means that we need to pre-teach key concepts for better understanding.  What this means is that learners actually learn better and more deeply if they already know the names and characteristics of the subject. So, why is this important?  We again look at working memory, and the capacity of the brain to …

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6. Segmenting Principle

Over the last few weeks we have looked at techniques for reducing extraneous processing by our learners.  This week we start to look at essential processing, and how we make that better.  The first principle to do this is the Segmenting Principle. The Segmenting Principle means that user-paced segments are better than continuous presentation. You …

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5 Temporal Contiguity Principle

Last week we looked at the Spatial Contiguity Principle and we found that related words and pictures need to be  close together.  This week we look at the Temporal Contiguity Principle. The Temporal Contiguity Principle tells us that students learn better when related words and pictures happen simultaneously.  So where last week we looked at …

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4. Spatial Contiguity Principle

Last week we learned that Pictures and Narration is better than Pictures and Narration and Text.  But what if you have to have Pictures and written text (no narration).  This week we look into this using the Spatial Contiguity Principle. The Spatial Contiguity Principle means that you want related words and pictures close together.  Let’s …

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3 Redundancy Principle

The Redundancy Principle is one in which you want to avoid overloading the learner’s working memory.  Remember that your student can only process so much information.  Any additional information beyond the learner’s capacity will be lost. In the redundancy principle we are looking at situations where additional information is not needed for the student to …

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