Apr 01

Diane Elkins Joins the iTeach Sitka Team in June!!

Elkins from artisan eLearning

Diane Elkins

(1) We are very excited to announce that Diane Elkins, co-owner of Artisan E-Learning, will join our iTeach training team. Our team this year includes, Mary, Maureen, Lori, Kathi from Sitka campus and Madera from UAF!

Diane is a trainer in the fast-growing field of “rapid development tools” and has written books and trained diverse clients in the use of products like Captivate, Lectora, Storyline, Jing. She is a master of story-boarding and managing training materials, videos and e-learning projects. Most recently Diane has created training materials with easy video production using whiteboards. (Have you ever looked at a “In Plain English” YouTube? These videos are a lot like those). We have a lot we can all learn from Diane.

Diane is excited to share her knowledge and work with you during the June 3-7 iTeach week in Sitka.

(2) Remember iTeach is your week to work on your online course(s), get 1:1 help from Sitka and Fairbanks Instructional Designers, learn and collaborate with colleagues and have fun while constructing your online materials! There is a stipend attached to the week. Be sure to apply soon.

(3) This year some UAA faculty will be joining our iTeach week. This should enrich your learning environment to work with people from other campuses.

(4) Even if you have attended an iTeach in the past– you CAN APPLY AGAIN! Join us in June. We expect the week to be great.

For full information on how to apply for our iTeach, please check out:

iTeach Information

Kathi

Mar 28

SoftChalk Learning Page for UAS Faculty

UAS has a SoftChalk Learning Page for faculty where prior webinars and additional video tutorials are posted. If you missed a webinar or want to review the content again, please visit the page. (Please note – some videos do not play in the Chrome browser.)

The following videos are currently available:

 SoftChalk video tutorials
  • SoftChalk overview (recorded webinar; 50 minutes)
  • SoftChalk introduction (recorded webinar; 3 hrs)
  • How to create a connection between Blackboard and SoftChalk 7 (3 minutes)
  • How to manually upload a lesson created in SoftChalk 7 to Blackboard (4 minutes)

 

Mar 21

Assessment and Alignment

We’ve added a new category to our web-based resources and included the content below. Find these resources and more on our web-based resources page.

Professor Dancelot and the Perils of a Misaligned Course

No one would really teach a dance class this way, would they? This video takes a humorous look at what can go wrong when a course’s learning activities do not align with the intended outcomes and assessment. Although this is an exaggerated example, it reminds us to look at the courses we teach to see if any of the elements are out of alignment.

Assessment & Instructional Alignment – An Online Tutorial for Faculty

Learning assessment is more than testing students and assigning grades. It is a system that provides feedback about student learning. This tutorial introduces an assessment approach using the Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy. Using the taxonomy can improve your assessment system and improve student learning by aligning course objectives, activities and assessments with each other. In this course you’ll learn how to:

  • Write observable learning objectives.
  • Choose learning activities that support your learning objectives.
  • Choose assessments that match your activities and objectives.
  • Use a taxonomy to align learning objectives, activities and assessments.

Mar 19

New Webinar Opportunity

respondus

Respondus is a powerful tool for creating and importing exams into your Blackboard courses. Two, free forty-five minute sessions are offered to introduce you to Respondus 4.0. These sessions are also great for those of you who are familiar with the software but would like a refresher.

Wednesday, March 27th at 2 p.m. ET – Register

Thursday, March 28th at 4 p.m. ET – Register

Seats are limited, so be sure to sign up soon if you are interested. The sessions will cover the following:

  • Overview of Respondus 4.0
  • Using the Import Wizard to bring in questions from other sources, including formatting tips for Word files
  • Copying items from other Respondus files from the Edit Tab
  • Accessing publisher test banks through the Respondus Test Bank Network
  • Using the Retrieval Tab to reuse and/or edit assessments already in your LMS
  • A chance to ask questions

UAS has a site license for Respondus and you can download the program, using your UA username and password, at http://www.uas.alaska.edu/idc/respondus/index.html.

Mar 13

Google Boot Camp “ON” — Summit Postponed!

The Google Boot Camp (April 4/5) is ON, but unfortunately the summit itself has been postponed indefinitely. While this is disappointing, the good news is that the boot camp will be tailored to meet the needs of teachers who want to become Google Certified Instructors AND those who really want an intense “how to use” the google suite of tools, or how do I show teachers how best to use these tools in the classroom.

The Google suite of free tools can be used by any faculty, staff, or student. And, while UAS may not officially be a google campus, many of our students have Google accounts already through the university, or through personal accounts.

You can read more about the Boot Camp here: http://ak.gafesummit.com/bootcamp   I’ve been in contact with the organizers and they assure me that both days will be filled with activities that will enhance your use of these tools in the face-to-face classroom, hybrid or fully online classroom and/or in your work or play.

Think about joining us at the Google Boot Camp!

Kathi

Mar 06

Reminder: Google in Education Alaska Summit

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This high intensity, two-day event in April (6-7) at the University of Alaska Anchorage focuses on deploying, integrating, and using Google Apps for Education and other Google Tools to promote student learning in K-12 and higher education. The program features Google Certified Teachers, Google Apps for Education Certified Trainers, practicing administrators, solution providers, Google engineers, and representatives from the Google education teams. For more information and to register visit the original blog post.

Feb 28

Reminder: SoftChalk Webinar March 6!

Image of person viewing webinarJoin us for an info-packed, hands-on webinar Wednesday, March 6 from 8:30 am – 12:00 pm!

You must register prior to March 6 to receive the download files and log on information. How do you do that? View our blog post for all that good information!

Image: ©iStockphoto.com/CamiloTorres

Feb 27

Some Things I Learned at ASTE 2013

I just returned from the ASTE 2013 Conference in Anchorage and thought I might share a few things that I took away. First, one of the keynote speakers, Cara Heitz showcased her k12 classroom that was based on using blogs and wikis. She stressed that teachers today need to design their own professional development to fit their needs. I believe that she is right. We have to actively stress to stay relevant and find the tools that help us to be more efficient and effective learners and teachers.

Steven Moss gave us some great lessons learned from research. One thing that he stressed was that there is NO research to support the claim that our “digital native” students, brought up with technology, learn differently from older people. NONE. He says that the brains of this ‘net’ generation have not suddenly developed new neurological pathways, or morphed. They are not innately better at technology or multi-tasking! They may have better attitudes and enjoy change more than older people/students, but don’t believe the hype that their brains are remapping to better use technology. He also gave us these three pearls:

  1. Information-understanding-knowledge are not synonymous. We must figure out ways to have our students use the information and turn it into knowledge
  2. There is NO proven relationship between increased time on task and learning – in other words, don’t mistake engagement with learning.
  3. The Everest Fallacy – don’t just use technology “because it’s there”

While we’re on the subject of technologies that are “there” – I learned about some pretty cool apps and programs that I am not currently using, but may try. Something I’ve learned over the years is that you can’t really incorporate something into your personal learning environment without trying it out, without giving it a trial period before you accept or reject it. And, rarely do I add more than one thing at a time. Well, here are some interesting places that you might enjoy checking out: Continue reading

Feb 21

Are Blogs Relevant in Higher Education in 2013?

Recently TLTR (both Sitka and regional) have discussed blogs. While the conversation centered specifically on the rationale for using a blog hosted external to the university’s course management system (like this WordPress blog) instead of a university supported tool (like the blog inside of Blackboard), we felt this might be a good time to talk about blogs in general. Why they might be used, how they differ from discussion boards, and just some pros and cons of using a blog inside of Blackboard or a blog external to your course.  At the conclusion of this post, we’d love you to comment, tell us your experience with blogs, positive or negative. Share with us what you like about blogs and how you are using them in your classes.

How Do They Differ from Discussion Boards?
First, let’s be clear, a blog can be used in many, many different ways. However, typically a blog is used by a person or group to publish ideas or information and solicit comments. In other words 1 post, many comments. Most blogs have 2 or 3 columns. The first often column contains content and comments; the second may have a list of recent posts and categories; finally, the last column may have a word cloud to help you find a topic quickly and a search bar. Of course this varies widely, as you choose the template and create the look and feel of your blog.

In contrast, the usual threaded discussion has posts that may have equal ranking from many people, and comments can generate their own small discussions. Unlike a blog which is quite chronological in nature, our Blackboard discussion boards, for example, can be organized by person, by topic, by date etc.

So if discussion boards are so flexible, why would we want to blog? Continue reading

Feb 20

Information For Your Students


Tips for Student Success has a new post that may be of interest to your students. Visit the blog to view the article by Alan Henry: How to Conduct Scientific Research On the Internet (Without Getting Duped).