International Year of Indigenous Languages

Sitka Alaska Tribe SealDid you know that the United Nations has declared 2019 as the International Year of Indigenous Languages?  This happened in a resolution that was adopted on December 19, 2018.  It is estimated that of the 6,000 to 7,000 languages spoken in the world today, one language goes extinct every two weeks.  According to the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) there are 2,680 languages in immediate danger.

Here in Southeast Alaska we need to keep working to raise awareness of our native languages, Tlingit, Eyak, and Haida.  These languages are important, not only for communication, but as a vessel of culture, traditions, and identity.  Culture flows through the language!

Take a look at this website, tlingitlanguage.com, and consider taking a class here at UAS.
http://tlingitlanguage.com/the-tlingit-language/

I also want to invite you to watch the following video:

Gunalchéesh and happy International Year of Indigenous Languages!

Accessibility – Designing for users with dyslexia

Here is the last of the 6 posters which are focused on Accessibility.

Today’s poster is:

Designing for users with dyslexia

Do

  • use images and diagrams to support text
  • align text to the left and keep a consistent layout
  • consider producing materials in other formats (for example, audio and video)
  • keep content short, clear and simple
  • let users change the contrast between background and text

Don’t

  • use large blocks of heavy text
  • underline words, use italics or write capitals
  • force users to remember things from previous pages – give reminders and prompts
  • rely on accurate spelling – use autocorrect or provide suggestions
  • put too much information in one place

 

View poster for dyslexia

 

The posters being shared are created by Karwai Pun and are from accessibility.blog.gov.uk.  There are currently six posters in the series and are general guidelines when it comes to the “do’s and don’ts” of accessibility.

Have a great weekend!!

Accessibility – Designing for users who are D/deaf or hard of hearing

Here is the fifth of 6 posters which are focused on Accessibility.

Today’s poster is:

Designing for users who are D/deaf or hard of hearing

Do

  • write in plain English
  • use subtitles or provide transcripts for video
  • use a linear, logical layout
  • break up content with sub-headings, images and videos
  • let users ask for their preferred communication support when booking appointments

Don’t

  • use complicated words or figures of speech
  • put content in audio or video only
  • make complex layouts and menus
  • make users read long blocks of content
  • don’t make telephone the only means of contact for users

 

 

View poster for Deaf or hard of hearing

 

The posters being shared are created by Karwai Pun and are from accessibility.blog.gov.uk.  There are currently six posters in the series and are general guidelines when it comes to the “do’s and don’ts” of accessibility.

Accessibility – Designing for users with physical or motor disabilities

Here is the fourth of 6 posters which are focused on Accessibility.

Today’s poster is:

Designing for users with physical or motor disabilities

Do

  • make large clickable actions
  • give form fields space
  • design for keyboard or speech only use
  • design with mobile and touch screen in mind
  • provide shortcuts

Don’t

  • demand precision
  • bunch interactions together
  • make dynamic content that requires a lot of mouse movement
  • have short time out windows
  • tire users with lots of typing and scrolling

 

View poster for physical or motor disabilities

 

The posters being shared are created by Karwai Pun and are from accessibility.blog.gov.uk.  There are currently six posters in the series and are general guidelines when it comes to the “do’s and don’ts” of accessibility.

Accessibility – Designing for users with low vision

Here is the third of 6 posters which are focused on Accessibility.

Today’s poster is:

Designing for users with low vision

Do

  • use good contrasts and a readable font size
  • publish all information on web pages (HTML)
  • use a combination of colour, shapes and text
  • follow a linear, logical layout -and ensure text flows and is visible when text is magnified to 200%
  • put buttons and notifications in context

Don’t

  • use low colour contrasts and small font size
  • bury information in downloads
  • only use colour to convey meaning
  • spread content all over a page -and force user to scroll horizontally when text is magnified to 200%
  • separate actions from their context

 

View poster for low vision

 

The posters being shared are created by Karwai Pun and are from accessibility.blog.gov.uk.  There are currently six posters in the series and are general guidelines when it comes to the “do’s and don’ts” of accessibility.

Accessibility – Designing for users of screen readers

Here is the second of 6 posters which are focused on Accessibility.  (Poster 1 was last Friday, so if you didn’t see it, go back and take a look!)

Today’s poster is:

Designing for users of screen readers

Do

  • describe images and provide transcripts for video
  • follow a linear, logical layout
  • structure content using HTML5
  • build for keyboard use only
  • write descriptive links and heading – for example, Contact us

Don’t

  • only show information in an image or video
  • spread content all over a page
  • rely on text size and placement for structure
  • force mouse or screen use
  • write uninformative links and heading – for example, Click Here

 

 

View poster for screen readers

 

The posters being shared are created by Karwai Pun and are from accessibility.blog.gov.uk.  There are currently six posters in the series and are general guidelines when it comes to the “do’s and don’ts” of accessibility.

Accessibilty – Designing for users on the autistic spectrum

Happy 2019!!!  I have a very special subject to get the year started right!!

Today and next week is going to be dedicated to accessibility.  The posters I will be sharing are created by Karwai Pun and are from accessibility.blog.gov.uk.  There are currently six posters in the series and are general guidelines when it comes to the “do’s and don’ts” of accessibility.

Today’s poster is:

Designing for users on the autistic spectrum

Do

  • use simple colors
  • write in plain English
  • use simple sentences and bullets
  • make buttons descriptive – for example, Attach files
  • build simple and consistent layouts

Don’t

  • use bright contrasting colors
  • use figures of speech and idioms
  • create a wall of text
  • make buttons vague and unpredictable – for example, Click Here
  • build complex and cluttered layouts

 

 

 

View poster for the autistic spectrum

Happy Holidays

Happy Holidays from the Faculty Learning Corner!!!

Enjoy your time off and I’ll see you Spring Semester!!!

VoiceThread 5 of 5

Last One!!!  Here is the 5th of the 5 part series.  In this episode we look at “Advanced Skills” such as integrating Google Drive, changing the speed of auditory comments, and changing text size of text comments.  It also looks at changing presentation settings, and much, much more!

 

This video is about 34 minutes long, so watch in it multiple sittings, or skim through the whole video and then come back to sections to refresh your knowledge as needed.

Here is a list showing the start times of each section.  Just go to the time listed below, and that will take you directly to that section in the video.

Beginning – Intro to Video

0:43 – Cover Art (and VT Review)

4:56 – Adding to/ Merging VoiceThread Presentations

8:37 – Google Drive Integration

10:31 – Adding a Video File

13:08 – Speeding Up / Slowing Down Comments

14:17 – Resizing Text Comments

15:11 – Accessibility-Editing Closed Caption Files

18:41 – Searching for a Comment

19:40 – Changing Comment Methods

21:21 – Changing Presentation Settings

22:48 – Display Preferences and Languages

24:25 – Allowing Students to add slides to the VoiceThread

26:15 – Video Commenting

28:08 – Notifications

30:34 – Public Browse Page and Training Menu

Thanks for watching this series of videos, and Happy VoiceThreading!!

VoiceThread 4 of 5

Here is the 4th of the 5 part series.  It is focused on VoiceThread in our Learning Management System (LMS), Blackboard.  There is a lot of great information in this video about building links that are graded and ungraded, the grading interface with Blackboard, copying a VoiceThread to a new semester, and even shows an example from a student point of view.

 

This video is about 24 minutes long, so this is another video that you might want to watch in multiple sittings, or watch the whole thing and then come back to sections to refresh your knowledge as needed.

Here is a list showing the start times of each section.  Just go to the time listed below and that will take you directly to that section in the video.

Beginning – Intro to Video

0:31 – LTI Links

2:59 – Overview-6 Types of Links You Can Add

5:01 – Home Page: Non-Graded Link

7:03 – Course View: Non-Graded Link

8:08 – Individual VT: Non-Graded Link

9:03 – Review of Ungraded Links

10:09 – Watch a VoiceThread: Graded Link (Assignment Builder)

11:41 – Quiz/Submit a Comment: Graded Link (Assignment Builder)

13:11 – Student Presentation/Create a VoiceThread: Graded Link (Assignment Builder)

14:45 – Copying the VoiceThread to Another Semester

17:06 – The Student Perspective

20:49 – Grading Interface

23:14 – Training Menu